Steven Grabiner

Steven Grabiner

Steven Grabiner finally made it to Israel. The savings bonds that he received at his Bar Mitzvah had come to maturity and provided the fare to Israel. After a brief stay in Tel Aviv he wound up on a kibbutz in the Jezreel Valley where he could study Hebrew and religious instruction for half the day and work the other half of the day. From there he would take time out to explore the countryside, the historical sites, and his Jewish heritage.

There was one everpresent question on his mind. It surfaced as he spoke with both old and young. What does it mean to be Jewish? Almost everyone Steven met in Israel was either atheistic, agnostic, or had only a vague concept of God; yet they strongly considered themselves Jewish. When asked how they could be Jewish when they didn't believe what the religion meant, there was never an adequate reply. He went to Israel in hope of finding answers to the most important questions in his life. He returned to the U.S. with more questions.

However, being in Israel did impress upon Steven the vibrancy and reality of the Scriptures. Places rich with history supported the history of the Torah. Moses actually was God's agent in raising a people for Himself. The people were delivered from their slavery and bondage. This realization helped create within Steven the desire to be liberated from habits and behaviors that bound him.

Struggle as he might, there was no escape. Then a friend suggested that he simply ask God for guidance and freedom. Without fully realizing the implications, Steven asked God to reveal Himself, to show Himself. God graciously answered that prayer by instilling a distaste for those habits that had bound him. The more Steven learned of the God of Israel, the more true freedom he experienced. Steven began to read the Holy Scriptures for himself and the questions that once perplexed him have been answered.

Originally from:  Jewish Discoveries by Jeff Zaremsky, page 51, which contains a total of 22 fascinating chapters of biblical history and lessons plus 25 rich Jewish tradition sections, and 27 powerful testimonies, with over 40 beautifully rendered professional works of art all on over 300 jam packed pages.  You can own this treasure by visiting www.Jewishheritage.net

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