How to Make Kiddish

How to Make Kiddish

Kiddush, like candles, sanctifies the Sabbath.

Making kiddush is a simple religious act that sanctifies the Jewish Sabbath, making it distinct from the six other days of the week. It requires little in terms of preparation and execution, but makes a huge difference in the sanctity of the Sabbath table.

Instructions
1.    Rinse out the kiddush cup. Silver cups made especially for the purpose are preferred, but you may use any cup that is free of imperfections.
2.    Fill the cup to the brim with kosher wine or grape juice.
3.    Open the siddur (Jewish prayer book) to the page for the appropriate day for the kiddush (Friday evening, Saturday before lunch, holiday evening, holiday before lunch)...
4.    Raise the cup with your left hand and transfer it to your right hand (if you are left-handed, use the opposite hands). Some hold the cup from underneath, while others hold it conventionally.
5.    Recite the appropriate text from the siddur. For Friday night, many have the custom of standing for the first paragraph; otherwise, they should be recited while sitting. All present should be silent until the recitation and drinking of the wine is complete.
6.    Distribute a small amount of wine from the kiddush cup to others at the table and drink the wine. The person who recites the kiddush should drink before anyone else. Some have the custom of pouring a small drop of the kiddush wine into a small jug containing a larger amount of wine or grape juice, and then pouring from there into smaller cups for everyone else at the table.

Originally found here

 

Related Articles

More From Traditions

Alms (Tzedakah) Box

The Hebrew word "tzedakah" derives from the biblical word "tzedek" meaning righteousness or…
Alms (Tzedakah) Box

Torah Reading

The custom of reading from the Torah on Saturday mornings is so old that it is difficult to be…
Torah Reading

Minyan

In many Jewish synagogues a minyan is required for public prayer times. A minyan is a group of…
Minyan

Tsitsit

The custom of putting Tsitsit, fringes or tassels, on the corners of garments originates in the…
Tsitsit

Jewish Calendar

LUNAR-SOLAR CALENDAR.The Jewish calendar is based mainly on the phases of the moon; but it also…
Jewish Calendar

A Stone to Remember

Many cultures have different ways of dealing with death. One Jewish custom is to place a stone…
A Stone to Remember

Second Day of Festivals

Once the Beth Din had evidence that the new moon had been seen, (see FIXING THE CALENDAR) a new…
Second Day of Festivals

Circumcision-Jewish Tradition

Male circumcision is a well known Jewish tradition. Avraham (Abraham) was called by God and…
Circumcision-Jewish Tradition

Western Wall

The Western Wall is the western portion of the retaining wall of the Temple Mount where the…
Western Wall
Havdallah

Havdallah

Havdallah means “separation” and is a service used to separate the holiness of the Sabbath from…
Havdallah

Mezuzah

A mezuzah is a little box that is nailed to the doorpost of a Jewish home. The Hebrew word…
Mezuzah

Tzedakah

Tzedakah is from the word meaning righteousness. A tzadek is a righteous person.
Tzedakah

Publish the Menu module to "offcanvas" position. Here you can publish other modules as well.
Learn More.


donation